Link roundup June 17, 2013

  1. The Curse Of The Network Effect | TechCrunch

    • Marketplaces where either the buyer or seller expects to choose from an exhaustive listing – so-called “complete” marketplaces – typically give-up far more value than they are able to capture.
    • Unless they facilitate the transaction itself, these businesses often find themselves in a bind.

    Insightful about monetizing services or marketplaces that rely on being complete from the founder of an event listing service.

  2. Facebook Made Me Do It – NYTimes.com

    In a study of social exchange systems like Facebook, when people were told that their networks liked the content they were sharing, they shared more. But when they were told that people in their network did not like their shared content, they actually shared even more to figure out what their network might like, and “come up with more content that was edgier,” he said.

    I think that this is true in lack of approval/disapproval (if we don’t get likes or comments at all). If we get active disapproval my guess is that we’d be prone to share less rather than more. Interesting nonetheless.

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  3. How Accurate Are Fitness Trackers?

    But the devices were far less reliable in tracking the energy costs of light-intensity activities like standing or cleaning, often misinterpreting them as physical immobility. Only the calorie cost of typing was overestimated, and only by the armband monitor, which considered the arm movements involved to be far more dynamic than they actually are.

    That wrist worn devices are bad at detecting when we bike isn’t a surprise, but that they’re bad at detecting standing is news to me.

  4. Fertile Ground – Marco.org

    I don’t think most developers of mature, non-trivial apps are going to have an easy time migrating them well to iOS 7. Even if they overcome the technical barriers, the resulting apps just won’t look and feel right. They won’t fool anyone.

    This is another side of the coin of iOS7. It remains to be seen if Marco is right (I hope so). And if he is, I wonder if Apple did this as a conscious choice, or if it’s a (lucky) circumstance. This is an interesting post nonetheless.

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  5. Did Apple Just Ally With Microsoft Against Google?

    It’s a huge win for the giant of Redmond, which has long been hunting for more fronts to open up on Google in the search wars.

    This isn’t a win for Microsoft, it’s a huge loss for Apple users. Have you seen the Bing Challenge? It claims that most people choose Bing’s results when compared to Google’s. However, asking people to “just search for anything” makes it hard to evaluate the results. I did the challenge, but with with five searches that I actually needed results for. Result? Google won 4 of the rounds. Twice. There’s a reason people don’t use Bing, and it’s not “habit”.

  6. Microsoft Has Hired People To Make Positive Comments About Xbox One On Reddit, Contractor Says

    Obviously, we can’t confirm this story. We asked Microsoft for comment on if they have people on their payroll using Reddit and will update when they reply.

    This is sort of a damned if you do, damned if you don’t story. It doesn’t matter what Microsoft says here: they obviously can’t confirm it. However, the fact that this story can be born says a lot: the Xbox One is receiving a lot of negativity. Had it not, there would be no need to even fabricate a story such as this. So in the end, it’s still a product that (mostly) sucks according to people.

  7. The Irrationality of Giving Up This Much Liberty to Fight Terror

    we aren’t trading civil liberties for security, but a sense of security. We aren’t empowering the national-security state so that we’re safer, but so we feel safer.

    This isn’t happening only in the US. It’s happening in the EU and in Sweden. Everyone should read this, and realize that it’s time to say NO. Politicians gain from giving us a sense of security (not actual security) as it gives them more power.

  8. Smartphones vs tablets vs traditional PCs – and how iOS changed the world
    I love this visualization of smartphones vs tablets vs “traditional PCs”. And the post in itself contains a lot of insights about how iOS changed the world of computing, and also the challenges ahead. Note that this was written way ahead of the release of iOS 7 (and that Apple missed delivering on key features, such as “being able to choose another default app than Apple’s own”)

    Read the whole post here: Fraser Speirs – Blog – The iOS 7 Power User Challenge

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  9. “It was the perfect search engine,” Singhal said. “You could ask it a question and it would tell you exactly the right answer, one right answer—and sometimes it would tell you things you needed to know in advance, before you could ask it.”

    I recently switched to an HTC One and after trying out Google’s voice control in it, I really see how it could in just a few years become something akin to the Star Trek computer. It’s much more intuitive than Siri on my iPhone (and I did ask her lots of stuff). After having used Google’s voice control on Android, I’m even more agog about trying out Google Glass.

  10. Facebook is just fine — How to use the internet — Medium

    My newsfeed is almost all signal. This is, in part, because I am ruthless. If you are overtly negative (which is different than having opinions differing from my own), you get hidden. If I don’t find value in your postings, you get hidden.

    As much as I criticize Facebook for their shortcomings, it’s also good to give credit where it is due – and Facebook does have an amazing service at its core, just like Craig Mod writes here. The key is, just as mr. Mod writes, to hide everything that isn’t relevant and teach Facebook what you like and what you don’t. I do this a lot.

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